April update from the Library and Record Centre

Lambeth Palace Library and the Church of England Record Centre regularly embark on new projects and acquire and catalogue new material, from rare books and manuscripts to modern publications.  Every two months, we post here a brief update on some of our latest acquisitions, projects and upcoming events, to keep you up-to-date with our most recent news.

billyNew books!

Enjoy reading one (or more!) of our recently acquired new books.  Highlights include:

Magazines and journals

Lambeth Palace Library also collects a variety of magazines and journals.  You are very welcome to visit the Reading Room to consult these too.  Journal rackA few titles for which we have recently received new issues are:

Upcoming events

Lambeth Palace Garden Open Days with Great Hall entry and exhibition

Every first Friday of the month until September, 12 noon to 3pm

An opportunity to visit the Palace’s beautiful 11-acre gardens, enjoy a cup of tea and slice of cake, and purchase plants and honey from the gardens.  The 17th century Great Hall will also be open throughout the Open Days, with a chance to view a display of highlights from the Library’s collections.  Do come along and bring your friends and family.

There is an entrance fee of £5, which will go to a chosen charity each month, and there is no need to book.

Watercolour of Lambeth Palace

“Mysteries” Demystified: The Making and Meaning of the Lambeth Articles (1595)

A talk by Professor Nicholas Tyacke (University College London)

Tuesday 8 May, 5.15pm (admittance not before 4.45pm)  

Nicholas Tyacke’s books include Altars Restored: the changing face of English religious worship, 1547-c.1700.  The event is run in association with the University of London seminar on the Religious History of Britain 1500-1800.

All are welcome, but those wishing to attend should book a free ticket at www.nicholastyackelambeth.eventbrite.co.uk, or email juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org not later than Friday 4 May. 

Whitgift2

Reformation on the Record: the legacy of libraries

Monday 4 June, 2 – 4pm

The dissolution of monastic and pre-Reformation libraries destroyed the established structures of learning, but also provided opportunities for other institutions and individuals to form collections during the following decades. This workshop will explore the development of new libraries (such as Lambeth Palace Library, founded in 1610) and their role in preserving pre-Reformation books and manuscripts.

Led by period specialists, this workshop will offer you the chance to learn about the aftermath of the Reformation, looking in particular at some original examples of the books and manuscripts which survived the dissolution of the monasteries.

Please come to the Library entrance on Lambeth Palace Road.

This is a joint workshop with The National Archives.

All are welcome, but those wishing to attend should book a free ticket at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/reformation-on-the-record-the-legacy-of-libraries-tickets-43653612129, or email juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org 

RefonRecord

New Perspectives on Seventeenth-Century Libraries

Robyn Adams (Centre for Editing Lives & Letters, UCL):
Donations to the Bodleian Library in the Early Seventeenth Century,
Katie Birkwood (Royal College of Physicians Library):
Digging Deeper into the Marquess of Dorchester’s Library,
Jacqueline Glomski (Centre for Editing Lives & Letters, UCL):
Religion and Libraries in the Seventeenth Century

Tuesday 5 June, 5.30pm (admittance not before 5pm) 

This event will showcase some recent research on library formation, both public and private, in the seventeenth century. Three short talks will deal with patterns of book selection and acquisition as revealed by individual practice and in seventeenth-century theoretical writing on bibliography. The presentations will discuss the potential for research on seventeenth century libraries and the application of digital methods to this research.

In association with the University of London research seminar on the History of Libraries.

All are welcome, but those wishing to attend should book a free ticket at www.seventeenthcenturylibraries.eventbrite.co.uk, or email juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org not later than Friday 25 May.

Great Hall

Annual General Meeting of the Friends of Lambeth Palace Library, followed by a lecture and afternoon tea

Dr Peter Blayney: Printing the 1559 Book of Common Prayer: events without precedent

Thursday 5 July, 2.30pm (admittance not before 2pm)

An authority on the history of the early modern book trade, Peter Blayney’s most recent book is The Stationers’ Company and the Printers of London, 1501–1557 (2013).

This meeting, open to Friends of Lambeth Palace Library, will be followed by tea. Friends should book in advance with Juliette Boyd, Lambeth Palace Library, juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org  or telephone 020 7898 1400, not later than Friday 22 June.  Please join the Friends of Lambeth Palace Library http://www.lambethpalacelibrary.org/content/friends

xxH5145 A4 1559 sig2A1r

Recently catalogued in the Sion College Library Collection

More and more of the Sion College collection is now available through our online catalogue for you to search – with almost 15,000 items to browse, many of which can be requested in the Reading Room.

Cataloguing continues to reveal not only interesting volumes, but also bibliographic insights into the history of the collection. Recent additions to the catalogue include this 1824 edition of Peter Schmidtmeyer’s Travels into Chile, over the Andes (B17.10/Sch5), which added colour to the cataloguer’s desk with the multiple hand-coloured lithographs which feature in the volume. From scenes of everyday life and cultural activities, to curious wildlife the book is one of a number of works to be found in Sion which examines travel and exploration.

B17.10_Sch5

One of the many lithographs to be found in B17.10/Sch5

An elusive armorial ink stamp was found in an early 18th century work called Jus canonicum universum which was written by Anaklet Reiffenstuel (A95.5/R27). Printed in black and featuring a coronet and fleurs-de-lis at its centre, the image is surrounded by text reading: “Scipio prior de Guglielmis”. Do you know anything about this former owner or do you have any ideas about their identity?

A95.5_R27

Unidentified armorial ink stamp, A95.5/R27

If you’re interested in helping us to identify former owners or interpret inscriptions, you’ll be pleased to hear that there are now over 300 images which have been uploaded to the Sion Provenance Project so far. We’ve already received contributions and suggestions from people across the globe, but there are still plenty of pieces of detective work to be done and you can help. Why not go to the Project page and see what you can do? More images are being regularly added, so keep your eyes peeled.

The Sion Team will be heading to Crieff in May to give a presentation on the Sion Provenance Project at the Annual Meeting of the Independent Libraries Association. The talk will focus on the efforts that have been made to publicise the Sion College collection and engage the wider community through our crowdsourcing initiative. We want to inspire other libraries to engage with crowdsourcing and provenance research and we’re hoping that the Sion Provenance Project might be of especial interest to independent libraries who are seeking a novel means of capturing new audiences and expanding their reach.

Archive news

New acquisitions

The Friends of the Library have acquired a manuscript relating to the family of Daniel Wilson (1778-1858), Bishop of Calcutta, and a diary of Sir Henry Longley (1833-1899), son of Archbishop Longley.

Longley

Collections in focus

We continue to mark the centenary of the First World War with a blog post concerning Dick Sheppard, who ministered to soldiers at St Martin-in-the-Fields, and another relating to post-war clergy training. The archive collections document subjects which continue to be topical: the World Council of Churches, which celebrates its 70th anniversary, features in the papers of the prominent ecumenist Oliver Tomkins (1908-92), Bishop of Bristol. The evangelist Billy Graham features in the papers of several 20th-century Archbishops and other collections. Literary associations include the marriage record of the poet John Milton, whose Paradise Lost recently featured on Radio 4, and the writer Henry James, the origin of whose story The Turn of the Screw was told to him by Archbishop Benson at the Archbishops’ country residence, Addington Palace.

Prints034.103

The collection continues to support the Archbishop’s ministry, with an image from the Macdurnan Gospels forming a gift during a visit to Ireland. Both the Library and Record Centre feature in a new database recording collections relating to crime and punishment, including records of the National Police Court Mission, a forerunner of today’s probation service.

Msc1370f4v

Archives in print and the media

The 200th anniversary of the Incorporated Church Building Society, whose archive the Library holds including numerous church plans and other images, is marked by a new book. Other publications relating to the collections include an article on a portrait of Martin Luther formerly held in Lambeth Palace (Steffen Weisshaupt, “Anglican (Re-) Presentation? Two Paintings of Luther at Lambeth Palace”, Anglican and Episcopal History, vol 86, no 4, Dec 2017, pp. 396-418).

Free seats

In the Conservation studio…

Conservation StudioThis year in the conservation studio, conservator Alex Wade has been working on a funded project to clean and box 590 books in the early manuscript series. Here’s Alex to give an insight into what is involved in her work:

“These volumes contain some of our most precious and oldest pieces and are filthy. Dirt can penetrate the surface of the text and stain the material.

“I am completing anywhere between two to four books per day, the books get smaller in size as I progress through the series, meaning that I will be aiming to complete up to six books per day in the future. I am boxing one bay ahead of where I am cleaning to ensure that the material is transported safely from the store to the conservation studio. To do this I measure the book height, width, and depth and input those measurements into the Zund cutting machine and create a custom-made box. This protects the material from handling and storage damage, as well as defending it against the fire defence, water misting system we will have in place in the new library.

ToolsCleaning

“To do the cleaning I use a smoke sponge which is a natural material, soft sponge to wipe and dab away surface dirt. It is quite heavy duty and can remove a wide variety of surface debris. Once this has been done I go along the surface with a soft brush called a hake brush to make sure that there is no residue left behind.”

BeforeAfter2

Don’t forget you can also keep up-to-date with our news and events, and enjoy glimpses of some of the treasures in our collections, by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram, as well as on our blog

February update from the Library and Record Centre

Lambeth Palace Library and the Church of England Record Centre regularly embark on new projects and acquire and catalogue new material, from rare books and manuscripts to modern publications.  Every two months, we post here a brief update on some of our latest acquisitions, projects and upcoming events, to keep you up-to-date with our most recent news.

New books!

An insular odysseyEnjoy reading one (or more!) of our recently acquired new books.  Highlights include:

Magazines and journals

Journal rackLambeth Palace Library also collects a variety of magazines and journals.  You are very welcome to visit the Reading Room to consult these too.  A few titles for which we have recently received new issues are:

Pencils at the ready!

This year Lambeth Palace Library has once again taken part in the #ColorOurCollections social media campaign spearheaded by the New York Academy of Medicine. Libraries and special collections were invited to design and submit colouring sheets using copies of images from their holdings that could be enjoyed for free by the public. Lambeth has created a colouring book which showcases some of the wonderful illustrations which can be found within our astounding collections.  If you want to try your hand at adding wild colours to woodcuts or enlivening an engraving, the sheets are available to download here. We’d love to see some of your finished attempts, so please do email examples to jessica.hudson@churchofengland.org

Color

Upcoming events

An evening with the Library’s conservators

With an opportunity to view the conservation studio and discuss techniques and treatments with the Library’s conservation staff Thursday 19 April, 6-7:30pm (admittance not before 5:45pm)

Tickets £15 per head (£10 for Friends of Lambeth Palace Library), to include a glass of wine. Numbers will be limited. Please note that the conservation studio is reached by a medieval spiral staircase.

Friends and guests are welcome, but please book in advance with Juliette Boyd, Lambeth Palace Library, juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org or telephone 020 7898 1400, not later than Friday 13 April.

Conservation work

“Mysteries” Demystified: The Making and Meaning of the Lambeth Articles (1595)

A talk by Professor Nicholas Tyacke (University College London) Tuesday 8 May, 5.15pm (admittance not before 4.45pm)  

Nicholas Tyacke’s books include Altars Restored: the changing face of English religious worship, 1547-c.1700.  The event is run in association with the University of London seminar on the Religious History of Britain 1500-1800.

All are welcome, but those wishing to attend should book a free ticket at www.nicholastyackelambeth.eventbrite.co.uk, or email juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org not later than Friday 4 May.

Whitgift2

New Perspectives on Seventeenth-Century Libraries

Robyn Adams (Centre for Editing Lives & letters, UCL):
Donations to the Bodleian Library in t
he Early Seventeenth Century,

Katie Birkwood (Royal College of Physicians Library):
Digging Deeper into the Marquess of Dorchester’s Library,

Jacqueline Glomski (Centre for Editing Lives & Letters, UCL):
Religion and Libraries in the Seventeenth Century
Tuesday 5 June, 5.30pm (admittance not before 5pm) 

This event will showcase some recent research on library formation, both public and private, in the seventeenth century. Three short talks will deal with patterns of book selection and acquisition as revealed by individual practice and in seventeenth-century theoretical writing on bibliography. The presentations will discuss the potential for research on seventeenth century libraries and the application of digital methods to this research.

In association with the University of London research seminar on the History of Libraries. All are welcome, but those wishing to attend should book a free ticket at www.seventeenthcenturylibraries.eventbrite.co.uk, or email juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org not later than Friday 25 May.

Great Hall

Recently catalogued in the Sion College Library Collection

The Sion Team are working hard to catalogue the collection and are adding new records to the online catalogue each week which you can explore. In addition, more material is being uploaded to the Sion Provenance Project and your help would be greatly appreciated. Can you decipher inscriptions or help identify historic owners? Why not get involved, and visit the Sion Provenance Project website and contribute your ideas and suggestions?

sion coronationAn interesting item recently discovered is Edward Walker’s A circumstantial account of the preparations for the coronation of His Majesty King Charles the Second, and a minute detail of that splendid ceremony (B94.2/W15(1)). This is the first work in a bound volume of three published accounts of the coronation ceremonies of kings and queens. Printed in 1820 from Walker’s contemporary manuscript, it describes in great detail the preparations for the crowning of Charles II in May 1660, his journey from Dover to London, and the pomp and ceremony of his coronation at Westminster. The other two works in the volume describe respectively the coronation ceremonies of George III and Queen Charlotte in September 1761, and of George IV on 19 July 1821. As fascinating as these accounts are, it is the unique additions to the Sion College Library copies which make them especially interesting. Each of the three descriptions has been extra-illustrated with various memorabilia from the coronations, including numerous portraits of the monarchs, plans of the processions and contemporary newspaper clippings. Souvenir prints of the ceremonies, some coloured by hand, have been bound with the volume, as have several tickets issued to gain access to Westminster Abbey, the processions and even the coronation services themselves. Together these items form a one-of-a-kind record of these historic occasions.

Archive news

New acquisitions and newly-catalogued items

Sections from the papers of Archbishop Runcie from 1987 have been made available for research. For more information please see the online archives catalogue. The Friends of the Library have acquired Latin verses of Thomas Keble (MS 5127), adding to the collection of material on the Keble family. The Library also acquired, by kind gift of a descendant of Mary Sumner, an addition to Mothers’ Union material: a photograph of Mrs Sumner (shown below), also picturing her husband George Henry Sumner, Bishop of Guildford, and Randall Davidson, Bishop of Winchester, later Archbishop of Canterbury (MU/PHOTO/4/3). One of our 2016 accessions, an account of Bishop Thirlby’s journey to Rome in 1555 (MS 5076), featured in the National Archives review of collecting.

MU-PHOT-4-3

Collections in focus

New posts on the Library blog have included the death of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd in 1282, the 50th anniversary of the charity Crisis at Christmas, and Anglican-Methodist relations. We continue to mark the centenary of the First World War with a blog post concerning the Mothers’ Union roll of honour. The Library also holds letters of the writer R C Sherriff, whose famous play Journey’s End is the basis of a new film. He was a friend of Gerald Ellison, Bishop of London, whose papers the Library holds. As this year sees the centenary of votes for women, readers may wish to revisit our blog post on women’s suffrage. This year also sees the 200th anniversary of the Incorporated Church Building Society, whose archive the Library holds.

New additions to our image database

Further additions to the Library’s image database include material relating to witchcraft (below) and further volumes from the collection of Greek manuscripts.

1597.15.03TPr

Archives in print and the media

The British Records Association published an article by Matti Watton, “Seven hundred years since a spade cost sixpence: Records of the Lambeth Palace garden”. The garden also featured in Gardeners’ Question Time. The Library featured in a BBC World Service programme on the Renovationist Church in Russia, a reform movement following the Revolution of 1917 which is documented in the archive of Archbishop Davidson and that of Canon John Douglas, a pioneer of relations with the Orthodox Churches whose papers the Library also holds. The Library holds extensive sources on Orthodox relations which of course continue to form part of the Archbishop’s ministry with his visit to Russia in 2017. The Society of St John the Evangelist, records of which are accessible at the Church of England Record Centre, forms the subject of a project on the Cowley Fathers during the First World War. A 15th-century printed book from the Library’s collection will appear on exhibition in Bruges from March onwards.

CERC update

ASBcoverRecords of the Committee of the Alternative Service Book dated 1967-1988 are fully catalogued and available here.

Henry H. Willmore Collection dated 1935-1940 (notes made by Henry H. Willmore on church spires and stone coffins) are fully catalogued and available here.

 

Don’t forget you can also keep up-to-date with our news and events, and enjoy glimpses of some of the treasures in our collections, by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram, as well as on our blog.

Remembering Reformation before the Reformation

Today we are excited to present a guest post from Dr Ceri Law, AHRC Postdoctoral Research Associate for the Remembering the Reformation project based at the Universities of Cambridge and York.

Historia Ioannis Hussi
Historia Ioannis Hussi et Hieronymi Pragensis: martyrum et confessorum Christi (Nuremberg: Katharina Gerlach, 1583), a8v. H4917.(H4) [*]
The ‘500th anniversary of the Reformation’, as 31 October 1517 has repeatedly been referred to, has been a very big deal indeed. The celebration of this anniversary of Martin Luther’s nailing of his 95 Theses (an event which, as many historians have pointed out, may well have never happened) proved stimulating. Books, events and projects years in the making have come to fruition, media (old and new) has been full of documentaries, articles and trending hashtags on Luther, anniversaries and the Reformation.

This, then, was a major cultural event, and anything that helps people to become interested in and learn about the past and the place that religious change played in history is, I think, very much to be welcomed. However, there is a danger that in remembering 31 October 1517 we forget a lot else, and this is what this blog post is about. Here I want to focus on one item from Lambeth Palace Library which features in a digital exhibition prepared by ‘Remembering the Reformation’, the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project, based at the Universities of Cambridge and York that I work for (you can find out more about the project at our website: https://rememberingthereformation.org.uk/, and you can find the digital exhibition at https://exhibitions.lib.cam.ac.uk/reformation/).

Hus woodcutThis is a striking woodcut showing the execution of the Czech theologian Jan Hus at the Council of Constance in 1415. Surrounded by flames and made to wear a cap covered with devils, marking him out as a heretic, this, as the Latin caption tells us, is Hus ‘while he gave his own body to be burned for Christ’. It is part of a late sixteenth-century text which celebrates Hus and his follower, Jerome of Prague (also executed as a heretic at the Council of Constance) as martyrs.

Whitgift
Gold-tooled armorial binding belonging to Archbishop Whitgift

We get some sense of what Hus meant to later generations of reformers if we look at the owner of this book, John Whitgift (c. 1530-1604), who became Archbishop of Canterbury in 1604 (we know that this book belonged to Whitgift because, like many other books in Lambeth Palace Library, it was bound in his arms). In one of his works Whitgift noted that ‘Master Hus, Hierome of Prague, &c, were stirred up even by God to preach his truth, and open the door of his word again’; in this he was expressing a very common Protestant view. In the famous Acts and Monuments of John Foxe (The ‘Book of Martyrs’), too, Hus is celebrated as a proto-Protestant martyr. Like John Wyclif (d. 1384) in England – sometimes described as the ‘Morning Star’ of the Reformation – Hus could be used as evidence of a Protestant history that extended back beyond 1517.

Admittedly, this commemoration of Hus was itself often part of the celebration of Martin Luther. Part of Hus’s importance for later reformers was the role he was supposed to have played in predicting Luther. It was claimed that Hus had declared before his death that another reformer, one that the Catholic Church would not be able to silence, would come 100 years after him. For Luther the 102 years between this and 1517 was close enough (on this see another item in the exhibition, a Lutheran timeline, which has been researched by my colleague Dr Bronwyn Wallace). The celebration of Hus was also part of efforts to answer a constant Catholic criticism of the reformers: ‘where was your church before Luther?’. Having, and commemorating, a history was part of the claims to legitimacy made by various Protestant groups.

But thinking about Hus can also help us, too, to remember the Reformation – and to do so in a way that questions the centrality of Luther and 1517. Hus reminds us that there had been movements that challenged the ideas and authority of the Catholic church long before Luther. The idea of Luther as the start of something new, as a decisive break with the past is a very influential one, but it’s an idea that we should question. The Lutheran Reformation was of huge significance, but it didn’t mark a neat dividing line, as was once suggested, between ‘medieval’ and ‘modern’.

Reformation special – Library and Record Centre update

Martin Luther printThis October marks 500 years since Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg – an event that would become known as the starting point of the Reformation.  Marking this 500th anniversary, Lambeth Palace Library is running a variety of events, including talks, Open Days and an anniversary exhibition. We have also been collecting an array of the latest books written on the subject. Why not join us for these events, check out the exhibition, or read one of our new books as we mark this anniversary year?

 

Reformation events and exhibitions

Reformation 500th anniversary exhibition

luther bible1Our anniversary exhibition showcases items from Lambeth Palace Library’s collections that feature in the Remembering the Reformation AHRC-funded project based at the Universities of Cambridge and York.  The project investigates how the Reformations were remembered, forgotten, contested and re-invented.  Our accompanying exhibition stars some of our greatest treasures, ranging from Godfrey’s dagger, to the beautifully illuminated 15th century Broughton Missal and a 16th century Bible believed to have been used and annotated by Martin Luther himself (shown right).  You can view the exhibition at all of the events below, alongside a display on the Council on Foreign Relations, celebrating 50 years of ecumenical relations.  Click on the image below for the full exhibition programme, and follow this link to view the Remembering the Reformation project’s digital exhibition, which features the Lambeth Palace Library treasures alongside others from Cambridge University Library and York Minster Library.

Exhibition leaflet

Lambeth Heritage Festival

Library Open Day with Reformation 500th anniversary exhibition

Monday 18 September, 12pm-3pm. At Lambeth Palace Library.

dagger1There’s still time to join us for the last of our Open Afternoons, which form part of our programme of events for this year’s Lambeth Heritage Festival.  Visit the Great Hall, featuring our exhibition commemorating the Reformation’s 500th anniversary.  There’s also a chance to see the display on the Council on Foreign Relations, celebrating 50 years of ecumenical relations.  You can visit the Reading Room too and chat to staff about our collections and services.

There is no need to book. Entry is via the Library entrance on Lambeth Palace Rd.  Contact archives@churchofengland.org or 020 7898 1400 with queries.

‘Remembering the Reformation’: launch of a major digital exhibition linked with the Arts and Humanities Research Project

Thursday 28 September, 6pm (admittance not before 5.30pm). In Lambeth Palace Library Great Hall.

BroughtonThis event celebrates the launch of the digital exhibition produced by the Remembering the Reformation project based at the Universities of Cambridge and York, which explores how the Reformation in Britain and Europe was remembered, forgotten, contested and reinvented. The digital exhibition is a collaborative enterprise incorporating some of the many treasures of the Cambridge University Library, York Minster Library and Lambeth Palace Library. The launch will include a display and demonstration of the exhibition website, and will be accompanied by short talks by the four members of the project team, Brian Cummings, Ceri Law, Bronwyn Wallace and Alexandra Walsham. Most of the Lambeth items that feature in the digital exhibition are on display as part of the accompanying Reformation exhibition in the Great Hall. This event will be followed by a drinks reception.

All are welcome, but those wishing to attend are asked to register with juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org not later than Friday 22 September.

‘Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet’: talk by Professor Lyndal Roper (University of Oxford)

Martin Luther printThursday 5 October, 5.30pm (admittance not before 5pm). In Lambeth Palace Library Great Hall.

This is a joint event with the Faculty of History, University of Oxford.  The talk will be accompanied by an opportunity to see the Reformation exhibition and will be followed by a drinks reception.

All are welcome, but numbers will be limited and those wishing to attend are asked to register with juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org not later than Friday 29 September.

Blue Heron Concert in the Great Hall

Blue HeronSunday 8 October, 3pm (admission not before 2.30pm).  In Lambeth Palace Library Great Hall.

The acclaimed American vocal ensemble, Blue Heron, will perform pre-Reformation polyphonic music from the Peterhouse partbooks (copied c.1540 for use at Canterbury Cathedral). The performance will last about 1 hour and will be preceded by a short talk by Professor Nick Sandon, an expert on the partbooks.

This event will offer an opportunity to see the Library’s exhibition of material relating to Martin Luther and the Reformation.

Advance booking is essential. Tickets at £35 (£30 for Friends of Lambeth Palace Library) are available now through blueheroninlondon.bpt.me or telephone 0800 411 8881.

‘Reformation on the Record’: exploring the history of the Reformation from an archival perspective

RefonRecordThursday 12 October, 6pm (admission not before 5.30pm).  In Lambeth Palace Library Great Hall.

Dr Marianne Wilson (Early Modern Research Associate, The National Archives) will explore the vast collection of Reformation-related documents held at The National Archives, and will also discuss some of the treasures of Lambeth Palace Library, to elucidate the benefit of using archival sources to investigate the history of the English Reformation. This event will offer an opportunity to see the Library’s exhibition of material relating to Martin Luther and the Reformation.

All are welcome, but those wishing to attend should book a free ticket at http://www.mariannewilsonlecture.eventbrite.co.uk/, or email juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org not later than Friday 6 October.

‘A Very Short History of England’s Cathedrals’: talk by Professor Nicholas Orme (University of Exeter)

OrmeThursday 9 November, 6pm (admittance not before 5.30pm). In Lambeth Palace Library Great Hall.

An expert on the history of medieval children and education, Nicholas Orme’s most recent book is on the history of England’s cathedrals. This event will offer an opportunity to see the Library’s exhibition of material relating to Martin Luther and the Reformation.

All are welcome, but those wishing to attend should book a free ticket at http://www.nicholasormelecture.eventbrite.co.uk/, or email juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org not later than Friday 3 November.

New books on the Reformation

Lambeth Palace Library has recently been purchasing a variety of new books offering the latest research on the Reformation. Here are some of the highlights below:

Find out more about our Reformation resources…

In the upcoming weeks, our blog will be featuring posts from the Remembering the Reformation project, so keep an eye out for updates by following us here on the blog, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you would like to learn about other items from our collections that tell part of the Reformation story, you may also find our research guides a useful starting point. In particular:

  • 1532.4.01TPOur royal source guides, including a guide to our holdings relating to Henry VIII.  This introduces highlights such Henry VIII’s own copy of Thomas Abell’s Invicta veritas: an answere, that by no maner of lawe it may be lawfull for … Kinge Henry the Ayght to be divorsid,  which features the King’s own irate annotations (including a note in Latin on the title page roughly meaning “Rubbish”).
  • Our source guides for researching Archbishops of Canterbury, including a guide to Archbishop Cranmer. Featured highlights include Cranmer’s Register containing papal bulls by which Cranmer was appointed to the see of Canterbury and the Archbishop’s protestation at his consecration in March 1533, after the oath of loyalty to the Pope, that this would not override the law of God and his loyalty to the King or hinder the reformation of the English Church.

Archive news

MS 4513In other news, our archivists have catalogued additional papers relating to the 1968 Lambeth Conference under Archbishop Ramsey, the last Lambeth Conference organised from Lambeth Palace before administration passed to the Anglican Consultative Council. The Friends of the Library purchased a set of early 18th-century catalogues of parochial libraries in Middlesex. Other new accessions included further records of Lord Wharton’s Charity, which funded the purchase of Bibles and other books. New additions to the image database include a 14th-century breviary and another breviary of Abbotsbury Abbey, plus an annotated copy of Cicero published in 1466. Further blog posts include a glimpse of life at Lambeth Palace. New publications have appeared which relate to the Library’s holdings, including an article on the fate of Archbishop Sheldon’s books following his death in 1677.

We hope to see you at some of our events over the coming months!

 

July update from the Library and Record Centre

Lambeth Palace Library and the Church of England Record Centre regularly embark on new projects and acquire and catalogue new material, from rare books and manuscripts to modern publications.  In this blog series, we post brief updates on some of our latest acquisitions, projects and upcoming events, to keep you up-to-date with our most recent news.

New books!

Education of Anglican clergy coverHighlights from our most recently acquired modern books include:

Magazines and journals

Journal rackLambeth Palace Library also collects a variety of magazines and journals.  You are very welcome to visit the Reading Room to consult these too.  A few titles for which we have recently received new issues are:

  • Alcuin Club Joint Liturgical Studies
  • Crucible: the journal of Christian social ethics
  • European Anglican
  • The Journal of Ecclesiastical History
  • Parliamentary History
  • The Prayer Book Society Journal
  • Reformation
  • The Tablet
  • The Tyndale Society Journal

 

Upcoming events

Lambeth Palace Garden Open Days with Great Hall entry and exhibition

Watercolour of Lambeth PalaceEvery first Friday of the month 12 noon to 3pm, April to September

An opportunity to visit the Palace’s beautiful 11-acre gardens, enjoy a cup of tea and slice of cake, and purchase plants and honey from the gardens.  This year, the 17th century Great Hall will also be open throughout the Open Days, with a chance to view a display of highlights from the Library’s collections.  Do come along and bring your friends and family.

There is an entrance fee of £5, which will go to a chosen charity each month, and there is no need to book.

 

Lambeth Heritage Festival

Library Open Days with Reformation 500th Anniversary exhibition

Great HallMonday 4, 11 and 18 September, 12pm-3pm. At Lambeth Palace Library

Lambeth Palace Library’s collections date from the ninth century to the present day, their broad scope reflecting the Church of England’s involvement in national and international history.   Visit our reading room, talk to our staff, and learn more about our collections and services. There is also a chance to see the Great Hall of Lambeth Palace, which includes an exhibition commemorating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation.

There is no need to book. Entry is via the Library entrance on Lambeth Palace Rd.  Contact archives@churchofengland.org or 020 7898 1400 with queries. Photo (right) by Jonty Sexton.

 

Guided tours of Lambeth Palace Library

Friday 1 and 15 September at 11am only.

Conservation workA rare opportunity to see behind the scenes at Lambeth Palace Library. This tour, lasting approximately 75 mins, will include a visit to the conservation studio and talks from archives and printed books staff about the history of the library and its collections, as well as the work that goes on in the library today. There will also be an opportunity to see the Great Hall and an exhibition commemorating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation.

Booking is essential and places are limited to a maximum of 12. Entry is via the main Palace entrance on Lambeth Palace Rd. Contact archives@churchofengland.org or 020 7898 1400 to book.

 

‘Remembering the Reformation’: launch of a major digital exhibition linked with the Arts and Humanities Research Project

Remembering the Reformation logoThursday 28 September, 6pm (admittance not before 5.30pm). In Lambeth Palace Library Great Hall

Based at the Universities of Cambridge and York, this project explores how the Reformation in Britain and Europe was remembered, forgotten, contested and reinvented. The exhibition is a collaborative enterprise incorporating some of the many treasures of the Cambridge University Library, York Minster Library and Lambeth Palace Library. ZZ1523.1 coverThe launch will include a display and demonstration of the exhibition website, and will be accompanied by short talks by the four members of the project team, Brian Cummings, Ceri Law, Bronwyn Wallace and Alexandra Walsham. Some of the Lambeth items that feature in the digital exhibition will also be on display, together with associated material relating to Martin Luther and the Reformation. This event will be followed by a drinks reception.

All are welcome, but those wishing to attend are asked to register with juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org not later than Friday 22 September.

 

‘Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet’: talk by Professor Lyndal Roper (University of Oxford)

Martin Luther printThursday 5 October, 5.30pm (admittance not before 5pm). In Lambeth Palace Library Great Hall

This event will be accompanied by a small exhibition of material relating to Martin Luther and the Reformation and will be followed by a drinks reception.

A joint event with the Faculty of History, University of Oxford. All are welcome, but numbers will be limited and those wishing to attend are asked to register with juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org not later than Friday 29 September.

 

Sion College Library Provenance Project Relaunch!

The Sion College Library Provenance Project has been officially relaunched on an exciting new platform. The site is now available for viewing on WordPress where users are warmly invited not only to look at images of the wonderful and rich provenance evidence that can be found in the Sion College collection, but also to contribute comments which will help us to identify former owners, assist with transcriptions, identify bindings and much more – enabling us to enrich our catalogue records yet further for the benefit of researchers. Please do have a look at the new site – we would love to hear your thoughts and get your input. You can find out more by reading the related blog post, which can be found here.

Sion Provenance Project homepage
New Sion Provenance Project website

 

On Monday 3rd July we celebrated Sion College Founders Day, where c.100 guests were invited into the Great Hall to view the latest exhibition of Sion material showcasing volumes relating to travel and discovery (which is surprisingly well represented in the collection), as well as introducing some of the former owners of Sion books, such as George Berkeley and John Wall Callcott.

Sion Founders Day
Sion Founders Day, with c.100 guests from Sion College in the Great Hall

Viewers had the chance to see works such as the beautifully illustrated Campi phlegraei: Observations on the volcanoes of the two Sicilies, written by William Hamilton (Naples, 1776, E61.1/H18). The book documents the late eighteenth century eruptions of Mount Vesuvius and includes numerous hand-coloured plates after the sketches of Peter Fabris, an example of which you can see in the image below. The exhibition also features Athanasius Kircher’s China monumentis, qua sacris quà profanis (London, 1789, B75/K63) which is abundantly illustrated with copper engravings and was intended to give the western world a glimpse of the mysterious and exotic kingdom of China.

Sion display
One of the display cases filled with Sion material which is currently on show in the Great Hall. Hamilton’s Campi phlegraei can be seen on the right

CERC update

MS 186Archbishops’ Commission to Revise the Psalter

Cataloguing of the papers of the Archbishops’ Commission to Revise the Psalter from the 1960s is now finished. Highlights of this collection include letters from CS Lewis and TS Eliot. Here is a link to the collection

 

Archives news

Newly-catalogued collections

Newly-catalogued collections include various papers relating to ‘episcopi vagantes’ (wandering bishops) and their interactions with the Church of England, complementing existing holdings in this area. For more information, please see the online archives catalogue.

MQ808.G7S8 title pageArchive projects

A project on records of the Court of Arches has been completed. As part of the project to prepare material for the move to a new Library building, certain Library collections have been moved to the Record Centre.

Collections in focus

Further blog posts included a wartime prayer list for Lambeth Palace chapel, and the coronation of George VI eighty years ago.

Archives on display

MU/PHOTO/2/8Images from the Mothers’ Union archive were displayed at a conference on women in religious archives. Various items from the Library’s collections are on display as part of the ‘Battles and Dynasties’ exhibition in Lincoln, including the St Alban’s Chronicle, Richard III’s Book of Hours, a royal genealogy from Adam to Henry VI, and the execution warrant of Mary Queen of Scots. Material on St Alban's Chronicledisplay in the Great Hall on 1 September, which takes place in tandem with the Lambeth Palace garden opening, will include items from the Council on Foreign Relations archive, cataloguing of which is nearing completion.

Archives in print

New publications appeared which relate to the Library’s research areas, including works on the education of the Anglican clergy and on the church of St James, Clerkenwell.

Don’t forget you can also keep up-to-date with our news and events, and enjoy glimpses of some of the treasures in our collections, by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram, as well as on our blog